A Product Review of Cebria

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Introducing Cebria

preview-full-shutterstock_118623172Cebria is a nutritional product deemed suitable for those who are over 50 and want to enhance their memory. It is a natural and patented formula that claims to increase memory so as to fight memory loss associated with aging. The company behind Cebria also claims that this supplement has been clinically demonstrated to enhance memory in only 30 days.

The question is – is Cebria an effective memory supplement that lives up to its promise? Or is it another marketing fuss that intends to mislead people? Read more to find out:

How Does the Product Function?

Based on the information stated by supplement’s manufacturer, the body generates less neuropeptides as you age that as you reach your 50s, you’ve already lost about 50 percent of your short-term memory.

Given this, Cebria touts to be a natural nootropic product that can enhance short-term memory and increase your capacity to store and preserve information, like other supplements such as Brain Abundance and Nootrobrain. These benefits for the brain are asserted to be obtained by using Neuro Pep 12. This is actually a patented blend of neuropeptides that promote better neural connections.

Cebria says it has already sold 12 million doses internationally. It is said to be formulated by a top European pharmaceutical company solidified with its 20-year experience of curing Alzheimer’s and helping stroke patients. The components that make this possible, as claimed by the company, are listed below:

Neuro Pep 12 proprietary blend 282.8mg, consisting of the following:

Lactose

Glutamic acid

Lysine

Leucine

Arginine

Aspartic acid

Serine

Phenylalanine

Valine

Threonine

Tyrosine

Isoleucine

Histidine

Methionine

Tryptophan

Cebria Cost and Money-Back Guarantee

There are four purchasing selections available:

30-day risk-free trial, including two bottles; just pay $9.95 to cover S&H fees.

1 Box: $59.95, plus $9.95 S&H

6-Month Autoship Program: $159.80

Super Saver Program: A total of 12 boxes for $319.60

The Risk Free Trial gives you the option to give back the unused portion to the company without any financial obligation on your end. You just need to cancel the trial within 30 days. If not, your credit card will be automatically charged $39.95 per bottle for a total of $79.90.

If you opt the Risk Free Trial or the 6-Month options, your enrollment to the company’s autoship program will follow. This translates to you getting Cebria regularly in which your credit card will also be billed for respective supplies.

No matter which selection you opt, the manufacturer says they’ll provide $60 worth of freebies like The New Memory Advantage. It is an e-book that has brain establishing games, nutritional guides, memory enhancement strategies and many others. Plus you’ll get a 30-day supply of Perfect Omega, saying this supplement is equivalent to the omega content of three bottles of fish oils. In order to get this addition, you need to pay $7.95 to cover for the shipping and handling.

Customer Reviews/Feedbacks/Testimonials

This particular supplement is created by Cebria, LLC that is mainly headquartered in Sherman Oaks, California. It is listed with the Better Business Bureau with a rating of B+ where it garnered four closed complaints in the last three years. But on the video posted on the official site, we saw a label of “Thera Botanics” on Cebria’s box. But when we dug some information about such company we didn’t find anything.

Cebria got registered in December 2013. It has lots of user feedbacks online, though many of these reviews are not so good. The typical criticisms customers shared were the trouble they had to go through to process the returns, the challenge in discontinuing autoship plans, ineffectiveness and expensiveness – all major factors that need to be considered by prospective buyers.

Final Recommendation for Cebria

Generally as a customer you need to watch out for red flags when thinking of purchasing such products. As we all know the nutritional supplement is filled with scams and it is always better to be on the safe side. This is specially the case when you’re dealing with an unknown company with unfamiliar supplements. Below are some of the red flags you should be cautious about:

Too good to be true assertions and over-the-top promises

Free trials and subsequent autoship program enrollments

Cebria seems to be involved with the aforementioned not-so-good signs. Manufacturers that utilize such schemes do not go unnoticed. Naturally, customers who have been victimized share their ugly experiences with the product. This appears to be the scenario as far as Cebria is involved since there are so many negative reviews. As mentioned, the usual grievances of users are the trouble of processing returns and refunds, discontinuing autoship programs, ineffectiveness and its steep cost.

We have read more than once that Cebria’s manufacturer is actually under investigation by the FBI, but we didn’t find anything that can support this claim. We also read that that you can even acquire generic supplements with the very same components for cheaper price.

Is Cebria the Real Deal or Not?

preview-full-MemoriesFor one, Cebria’s company cannot provide any clinical proof that this supplement is indeed effective for boosting brain capacities. The claims they make are nothing but promises, with no scientific background whatsoever. Plus, it also has the signs you should watch out for in recognizing scams. Companies offering their products via free trials and subsequent autoship programs are mostly suspected of being shady since they usually get a lot of negative feedbacks, mostly about the inconvenience their customers have to go through in order to discontinue autoship plans and process refunds. Plus, there are also many negative feedbacks about its failure to work as promised. With all these warning signs, it is better to consult with your doctor first about other nootropic supplements you can take with guarantee. This way, you wouldn’t need to experience any inconvenience and disappointment because you spent your money on the wrong product.